Trigger Digit



Stenosing tenosynovitis also known as trigger finger, trigger digit and trigger thumb, is one of the most common sources of hand pain and disability. It is a narrowing of a portion of the tendon sheath in the finger or thumb that interferes with normal finger movement. The flexor tendon causes painful popping as the digit is extended. The ring finger is most commonly affected, however any digit can be affected. Trigger digit is commonly found in middle-aged women, however anyone can be affected as both men and newborns have been diagnosed with trigger digit. The exact cause of trigger digit is unknown, and is more common in women than in men. Trigger fingers are associated with certain medical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout and diabetes. It is believed this condition may be caused by overuse and repetitive use of the hand and that repeated and strong gripping may lead to this condition. As a finger is bent and extended, the flexor tendons inside the finger glide smoothly through a series of fibrous tunnels located in the finger and hand. Trigger digit results from a narrowing of the first annular pulley located in the palm. Symptoms of trigger finger include finger stiffness, particularly in the morning, popping or clicking as the finger moves, tenderness or a bump at the base of the palm of the affected finger, limited finger movement, and the finger uncontrollably locking into a bent position and the inability to straighten. Treatment options for trigger digit includes rest, ice or heat, immobilization including night splints, stretching exercises, anti-inflammatory medications and steroid injections. In the event the finger is stuck in a bent position, surgery may be recommended to prevent permanent stiffness. Occasionally, hand therapy is required after surgery to regain better use.

Edit: V.2

Trigger Digit

Stenosing tenosynovitis also known as trigger finger, trigger digit and trigger thumb, is one of the most common sources of hand pain and disability.  It is a narrowing of a portion of the tendon sheath in the finger or thumb that interferes with normal finger movement.

The flexor tendon causes painful popping as the digit is extended.  The ring finger is most commonly affected, however any digit can be affected.  Trigger digit is commonly found in middle-aged women, however anyone can be affected as both men and newborns have been diagnosed with trigger digit.

The exact cause of trigger digit is unknown, and is more common in women than in men. Trigger fingers are associated with certain medical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout and diabetes. It is believed this condition may be caused by overuse and repetitive use of the hand and that repeated and strong gripping may lead to this condition.  As a finger is bent and extended, the flexor tendons inside the finger glide smoothly through a series of fibrous tunnels located in the finger and hand.  Trigger digit results from a narrowing of the first annular pulley located in the palm.

Symptoms of trigger finger include finger stiffness, particularly in the morning, popping or clicking as the finger moves, tenderness or a bump at the base of the palm of the affected finger, limited finger movement, and the finger uncontrollably locking into a bent position and the inability to straighten.

Treatment options for trigger digit include rest, ice or heat, immobilization including night splints, stretching exercises, anti-inflammatory medications and steroid injections.  In the event the finger is stuck in a bent position, surgery may be recommended to prevent permanent stiffness.  Occasionally, hand therapy is required after surgery to regain better use.